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dc.contributor.author Deutchman, Joshua G.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-17T17:09:17Z
dc.date.available 2013-06-17T17:09:17Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10829/4403
dc.description Thesis completed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Alfred University Honors Program. en_US
dc.description Thesis completed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Alfred University Honors Program. en_US
dc.description.abstract It is through the work of Abraham Maslow that some of us have come to know the term 'self-actualization.' Self-actualization is known within the field of Psychology, and thus assumed to fit within the paradigm of empirical sciences, yet it was never intended to be so; this term was merely the result of Maslow's desire to understand two of his teachers that he greatly admired. He quickly noticed similarities between them and many other 'healthy' people, and from these similarities continued to develop the conditions for psychological health. All the way, he acknowledged the unscientific nature of his work. Fittingly, my attempts to study self-actualization have followed the same path as Maslow's, as most of his developments were derived from his own self-exploration. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights.uri http://libguides.alfred.edu/termsofuse en_US
dc.subject Honors thesis en_US
dc.subject Psychology en_US
dc.subject Maslow, Abraham en_US
dc.subject Self-actualization en_US
dc.title Self-Actualization en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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