Alfred University Research and Archive (AURA)

The Prevalence of Rape Myths and the Likelihood to Sexually Harass

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dc.contributor.advisor Button, Amy
dc.contributor.advisor Singer, Sandra
dc.contributor.advisor McFadden, Laurie
dc.contributor.author Markajani, Summer
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-01T15:47:20Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-01T15:47:20Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05-08
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10829/8167
dc.description Thesis completed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Alfred University Honors Program. en_US
dc.description.abstract This study assessed rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. These topics are heavily prevalent in today’s social media, where rape myths and victim blaming are promoted. The high frequency of sexual assault and sexual harassment among women creates an additional need for research. The researcher analyzed how predominant rape myths are and how likely individuals are to sexually harass. The researcher additionally examined how well people can define sexual assault, sexual harassment, and rape. Hypotheses stated that men would be more likely than women to exemplify rape supportive attitudes and higher likelihood ratings of sexual harassment. Former or current athletes were also predicted to depict higher scores on the rape supportive attitude scale and higher likelihood ratings of sexual harassment. Finally, it was predicted that sex education would decrease an individual’s level of rape supportive attitudes and their likelihood to sexually harass. Participants completed the Rape Supportive Attitude Scale and the Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale (LTSHS). Participants also defined rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. Neither gender, athletic participation, nor knowledge of vocabulary significantly related to participants’ LSHS scores, RSAS scores, or their Comprehensive Sex Education (CSE) scores. Comprehensive sex education did not significantly relate to participants’ RSAS scores, LSHS scores, or their vocabulary definitions. There were no significant interactions between variables, but it is suspected that a small sample size contributed to the present findings. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Herrick Library en_US
dc.rights.uri http://libguides.alfred.edu/termsofuse en_US
dc.subject Honors thesis en_US
dc.subject Rape en_US
dc.subject Sexual assault en_US
dc.subject Sexual harassment en_US
dc.title The Prevalence of Rape Myths and the Likelihood to Sexually Harass en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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